Search Results for: abusive

Are You In an Abusive Relationship?

Are You In an Abusive Relationship? There are many levels of abuse. When people think of abusive relationships they often associate them with some kind of physical abuse.

Are You In an Abusive Relationship?

“No one can make you feel inferior without your consent” – Eleanor Roosevelt


There are many levels of abuse. When people think of abusive relationships they often associate them with some kind of physical abuse. Although physical abuse is one of the worst forms of an abusive relationship, abuse does not have to by physical, it comes in many disguises.

The different types of abusive relationships range from emotional, verbal, mental, sexual and physical or any combination of these. If you find yourself in an abusive relationship and you are trying to figure a way to get out, you need to proceed very carefully.

Some of the warning signs are:

* They blame you for everything, especially their anger or jealousy

* They are violent or they threaten you

* They control where you go, who you see and when

* They isolate you from all or most activities and friends

* They have bouts of uncontrollable emotional outbreaks

* They demean you, humiliate you, insult you, or embarrass you

* They make you feel insignificant and scared

* They force you to do things sexually

* They make you feel terrible about yourself

* You cause all the problems and they cause none of them

* And on and on

Read more >>>>>>

Is He/She Abusive? – You’re not Crazy. Stop the abuse.

Is He/She Abusive? - You're not Crazy. Stop the Abuse. Are you being abused? You may not know how to tell, but even worse, you may be thinking that you are the crazy one.

Are you being abused? You may not know how to tell, but even worse, you may be thinking that you are the crazy one.

Abusers work hard to distort our reality to make their reality feel safer.

So what is abuse? Is it someone who hits you emotionally or mentally hurts you  to get what they want? Sometimes, mostly not! Ask yourself this: does your partner hurt you repeatedly in any of those ways? Does he or she do it to satisfy their own emotional needs, or because they’re out of control?

Does she or he use the situation to lock you in so you have to tolerate it, or make a huge sacrifice to get away? If you see this dynamic in your relationship, you are being abused. The hurt of abuse can come in many ways, including physical attacks, mental attacks, verbal attacks, sexual attacks, or contact with friends and family.

You’re not Crazy

For many of us, struggling to live with this kind of abusive partner, the first handhold we need to grasp is that we are not crazy. Abusive behaviour isn’t normal. It is caused by an underlying disorder.

Most often, the disorders are borderline personality disorder, narcissistic personality disorder, or sociopath – technically called antisocial personality disorder. People who suffer from these disorders have extreme emotions, which lead them to actions that can range from puzzling to brutal. Living with them is painful and confusing.

Personality disorders are aptly named, because the minds of people who suffer from these disorders work differently than healthy people.

Read more >>>>> A WORLD OF INSPIRATION AND A LITTLE EXTRA!

BEWARE OF ABUSIVE PERSONALITIES WHO TRY TO ISOLATE YOU!

Hi! I think every great idea or post starts with a warm welcome, but this time its a little different for me. Because when it come a little to close for comfort to your own heart it is a little different don’t you think?.. Its a case of “been there and done that”and now you have to watch it happen right in front of your eyes to close ones that you love dearly, and you can’t do a dam thing about it.

ONLY THEY CAN GO WHEN THEY ARE READY!

If not…Then life has its way of forcing you back on to the right path one way or another or sometimes even out altogether” meaning not making it in this life at all!.

EMOTIONALLY ABUSIVE PEOPLE ARE:...Continue reading

Mental Abuse Information

Mental Abuse information –

Both men and women in  relationships, families and social circumstances can inflict mental abuse.

Stereotyped beliefs, myths and behaviour about roles for women and men  in families, relationships and social environments, and about what true love is,  are often at the root of mental abusive behaviour. Women in our culture are  often socialised to be accommodating, to believe that it is their job to care  for others at their own expense and to please men.

Men are often socialised to  believe that it is their job to protect women, to be in control at all times and  to “call the shots.” However often it is the reversal of these roles, which can  also cause mental abuse to be present for male survivors.

Both men and women in  relationships, families and social circumstances can inflict mental abuse. Stereotyped beliefs, myths and behaviour about roles for women and men  in families, relationships and social environments, and about what true love is,  are often at the root of mental abusive behaviour.

Many young  women and men believe that they must be in a relationship to be whole. They believe that they should devote themselves totally to their partner, often to the exclusion of other relationships and interests. Jealousy, possessiveness and  sometimes abuse, is seen as a sign of true love.

Believing that any relationship, even an abusive one, is better than no relationship at all, leaves individuals without the support that they need to leave an unhealthy relationship. Remember, mental abuse escalates. Mental abuse can and sometimes does, turn physical.

Fear and seeking help –

All types of abuse leave you frightened. The fear may not be limited to a fear for  physical safety. The fear can be more shapeless. You know you do not feel strong. You do not feel as if you can take risks. You do not even believe it is acceptable to try.

The abuse can start slowly, and perhaps not even feel  like abuse – just a simple “it’s all your fault” here and there.

Be warned that  mental abuse is often the precursor to more.

Unfortunately the classic tale  of mental abuse is often followed by physical abuse, and then sexual abuse. And  typically the cycle is that the abuser, at some point, apologies for the abuse. Then comes the honeymoon period during which things are relatively fine – and then the abuse starts all over again.

People who have grown up in abusive homes can easily duplicate those experiences in their adult lives. If you grew up in an abusive family, you know how frightening and hurtful the experience was. Do all you can to protect yourself and your children in the way that your  family did not or could not when you were a child?

If you were the victim of abuse as a child – you know only too well how much that hurt – you do not have to re-enact your childhood pain in your adult life. You do not have to treat others as you were treated.

Typically abuse, once begun, only escalates. Unless the abuser accepts responsibility for his/her behaviour and seeks  professional help – it is quite likely the abuse will continue and worsen.

There is help. There is support. No one deserves to be frightened,  terrorized or helped to feel hopeless and helpless about themselves and their  lives. The police, support networks and shelters take mental abuse just as  seriously as physical abuse.

HANSM– About the Author:

Signs of a Mental Abuser in a Relationship

Signs of a Mental Abuser in a Relationship. It's only very recently that during a conversation with someone very close to me that I have realised that I myself was in such a situation as this

It’s only very recently that during a conversation with someone very close to me that I have realised that I myself was in such a situation as this, while in a long term relationship.

I know that some may find it strange that a man is actually saying this, (as in so many cases it is usually the man who is the abuser, not the woman), but it is the truth and something I have realised, learned from, come to terms with and accepted. I am not ashamed or embarrassed to admit that this was the case, or looking for sympathy.

I am submitting this post to highlight this growing and sadly frequent situation that so may people find themselves in, both Male and Female. I have done a little study work on this subject and have found the following listed below as a guide to anyone who may want to learn more about the subject or may find themselves in a similar situation.

Isolation

An abuser often tries to isolate their victims by alienating them from friends and family. This causes the victim to depend on the abuser.

Accusations

The abuser may accuse the victim of being unfaithful if they discuss the opposite sex.

Sex as a Weapon

The abuser may guilt the victim into performing sexual acts to prove their love, or withhold sex as punishment.

Criticising

The abuser may constantly criticise the victim’s looks or weight.

Decision Making

The abuser may not allow the victim to have access to the finances or make decisions such as where to live or what car to drive.

The Victim

Victims of mental abuse may have low self-esteem, feel guilt when standing up for themselves, procrastinate, and are often in denial about the abusive relationship.

Information sourced from e-how.com

error

Enjoy this website? Please spread the word :)

:)
Scroll to Top
%d bloggers like this: